Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country is CDC’s largest single investment to ease health disparities that affect American Indians and Alaska Natives. Tribes and tribal organizations work on effective community-chosen and culturally adapted strategies to reduce commercial tobacco use and exposure, improve nutrition and physical activity, increase support for health literacy, and strengthen community-clinical links.
Eliminating foods such as caffeine, alcohol, processed food (including any bread), pre-made or canned food, salt, sugar, wheat, red meat, pork, fried and deep fried food, yellow cheese, cream, butter and margarine, shortening, etc., while focusing on pure foods such as raw fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, raw nuts and seeds, fish, vegetable oils, herbs and herbal teas, water, etc.[citation needed]
The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) supports awardees in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Awardees include large and small cities and counties, tribes, tribal organizations, and national and community organizations. These awards support cross-cutting programs to prevent and control chronic diseases and improve community health. Find information below about current and past community health programs.
Skip juice cleanses or liquid diets. A popular cleansing regimen for losing weight involves drinking only juice or another type of liquid for a few days to a week. This is dangerous because you could end up without essential nutrients. These extreme cleanses are also counterproductive because most people just gain back any weight they lost when they go back to eating normal food again. Doctors don't recommend any sort of diet like this, and say following a healthy diet and exercise routine is much better for losing weight.[15]
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